Terry O’Malley: Fort Collins Criminal Defense Attorney

Terry O’Malley

 

Do you need an experienced criminal defense attorney in Fort Collins and Larimer County? Contact Terry O'Malley for a FREE consultation about your case.

 Practice Areas:

  • 100% Criminal Defense and Litigation

Bar Admissions:

  • Colorado, 1991
  • Kansas, 1992

Education:

  • University of Kansas School of Law – Lawrence, KS
    • Juris Doctorate
  • Colorado State University – Ft. Collins, CO
    • Bachelors in Finanace

Associations and Memberships:

Location:

  • Opera Galleria Building
  • 123 N College Ave, Suite 220
    Fort Collins, Colorado 80524

Contact Information:

  • Phone: (970) 658-0007
  • Email: [email protected] 

How I Can Help You

I am a full-time criminal defense attorney in Fort Collins, Colorado. I spend all my time learning the details of criminal law better than anyone else. I can obtain better results than other lawyers because I care more and work harder than they do. I will travel to the courthouse to talk with a DA who won’t call me back. I subpoena records of the police, social services and other government offices just in case there is valuable evidence. I meet personally with all of our witnesses before trial. I make it a point to go visit a crime scene personally. This produces results. Visit our case results page to see how my winning strategies produces positive results.
It is important to work with a knowledgeable lawyer for your best defense for your future. When you call, I can provide you with an overview of what to expect with your charges, and how we address cases like yours. Next, I’ll invite you to make an appointment to sit down and go into more depth here at our office.  Since your criminal case has such huge implications for you and your family, you should meet me in person and determine two things:

Plus Icon FoCoWhether I will treat you like a knowledgeable friend and not just another client, and

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Whether I have more experience and knowledge than other lawyers concerning the court system and your charges.

Experience Makes the Difference

While reading this, you are probably struggling with the emotions of an anticipated court appearance and the difficulty of deciding who is a trustworthy criminal defense attorney to represent you. I am hired by you. I don’t trust district attorneys because I know they want to hurt you. After 25 years, I know how district attorneys and their bosses think.  I like winning. If I win a case for you, I expect you will tell others about the good job I did for you. I am your only friend in the system. God’s blessing, preparation and legal experience made the difference.

 

We strive to make your free consultation worthwhile and provide you with all the information you need to know.

Our Free Consultations

While our office strives to make you feel comfortable when you come in for a free initial consultation, we also strive to make your trip worthwhile and provide you with all the information you need to know at this challenging time. During our meeting, you should test me with a list of difficult questions.  Following our meeting, I will encourage you to think about your decision and not rush yourself.  Feel free to bring people you trust to the meeting, so you can discuss the attorney hiring decision with them.  With a pile of emotions confronting you, you need trusted family and friends at your side.

Who Is Involved in a Criminal Case?

When meeting with potential clients, I ask them to consider the mindset of everyone involved in their case – from the alleged victim to the police officers, from the judge to the district attorney. This will help you make wise decisions. Aside from your criminal defense attorney, below are six other key people involved in any criminal case:

The Alleged Victim:

This person may want you in jail: They are not your friend.

An alleged victim is the person making an allegation against you. They will have a bias against you and we need to clearly identify that bias. What motivates this person to call the police? What are they looking to get out of making the charges? How can we get them to tell the truth? Who knows this person and can tell us and a jury what they are really like. This person may want to send you to jail, or just to punish you.

The Police:

Officers ask questions designed to incriminate you.

Police officers ask questions designed to incriminate you. They are not looking for the truth in what occurred, although they will act like they are to keep you talking. They want to get a promotion. They try and get a “high five” from other officers. They want to convict you.  After you talk with them, they write down anything harmful you say, and will even misquote you if helpful to them. They know the law and will try and use a conversation with you to overcome expected defenses.  These officers are not your friend, even though they will act nice and laid back in hope you will talk to them and say things helpful to your prosecution.

The Deputy District Attorney:

The DA is hired to prosecute you.

A Deputy District Attorney is hired to prosecute you. They are good friends with the police, and know most officers from prior cases. Police give them work / cases so they continue to have a job. They support the police and the police support them. They do not believe anything you say to them, period. They will try and convict you, so they can appear loyal to the police and their supervisors.  They get promotions and encouragement from coworkers, office staff and the police.  Some DA offices have a dry eraser board where they list cases and the type of conviction obtained. They are not your friend.

The Judge:

Judges do not take any unnecessary risks on you.

Judges usually work each day with the same set of deputy district attorneys. During court breaks, they talk with DAs. I see judges laughing together with DAs and talking about weekend plans or vacations. Judges are paid and voted on by “the people of the state of Colorado”. DAs are also employed by “the people of the state of Colorado”. Judge’s enjoy their jobs and are trained to not take any unnecessary risks on you. They fear ending up in The Fort Collins Coloradoan with a news story about how you reoffended while under their supervision. Judges need to be retained and keep their jobs. So you must remember that they are people and they will err on the side of caution – protecting their jobs and their image with “the people of the state of Colorado”. Never be mistaken, they are not your friend.

Probation: Pre-trial Workers and Clerks:

You will be just another case to them.

Clerical staff work for the court. They are constantly around people accused of crimes all day long. You will just be another case to them, and there will be thousands of defendants after you. Clerks will protect a judge, or they could lose their job. Like judges, they work each day with deputy DAs and other court employees. They want to keep their position and are careful not to put too much trust in you, or they could lose their job. They have been burned in the past by people accused of crimes and will be careful what they say around you. You must be careful what you say around them. They will tell the DA and judge how you treat them and what you say. Be careful around them. Although they smile and appear polite, they are not your friend.

Counselors and Therapists:

Therapists write reports on everything you say.

Counselors, therapists and evaluators are called “treaters”: They obtain referrals from probation officers and courts and they must keep probation officers happy. Treaters are usually told what to do by probation officers. They keep probation happy in order to get more referrals. While they will be kind to get you to open up, they always write reports for probation on everything you say.  They are not your friend.

If you or a loved one is facing criminal charges in the Fort Collins area, be smart, exercise your right to remain silent, and contact Terry O’Malley, an experienced criminal defense attorney at the O’Malley Law Office at 970-658-0007. Together, we can protect your future.